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on. we did not decide to enforce that law, we decided to come up with reasonable speed limits and then enforce that law. we gave amnesty to all the people that had been illegally driving. get the back taxes. let's get to get them in the light of day so they are e andcted from abus an exploitation. we have high tech workers that don't come here but go to other countries and compete with us. we need people from ranchers to derek to farmers. i don't think this bill goes far enough. i would like to see more, but this is progress. >> your statement mentions several examples of how terrorist disadvantage of our system. even mention how awesome terrorists have applied and received asylum. you mentioned the bill would allow people will have filed a frivolous asylum applications benefits under the legalization system. do you know how many people fall into that category and how does the bill before us make the current system weaker? >> i do outlined in my written testimony a number of pages of terrorists who have taken advantage of asylum. we have most notably the case just a few weeks
on accountable government to enforce the rule of law. there are two problems that grow on government like mold on otherwise probably good bread -- corruption and inefficiency. it is important -- government corruption and inefficiency are what stands today between the american people and the economy and society that they deserve. to combat those pathologies, a new conservativism should center around three principles -- equality, diversity, and sustainability. let me explain. the first and most important of these couples is equality. the only way for the free market and civil society to function is to align the interests of a strong and those of the week, to have everyone play by the same set of rules. define this principle as how our government has always corrected itself. in the past the problem was political discrimination helped the disconnected down. today the specialty is dispensing political privileges to prop the well-connected up. in either case, the corruption is the same, official inequality, twisting the law to make some people more equal than others, making it harder for some to su
be held for questioning under the law of war. i'm asking this administration to leave on the table the option if the evidence warrants to designate this i had as an enemy combatcombatant. >> john: meanwhile other critics are wondering if the fbi did not do enough to investigate tamer tamerian. among those are republican new york congressman peter king. >> the fbi has given information as being potential terrorists, they don't look at them and then they carry out murders after this. what went wrong. >> john: but jay carney insisted that the fbi had done its job. >> the fbi followed up on the information that it received about tamerian tsarnaev. they investigated him thoroughly and did not find terrorism domestic or foreign. >> joining us a counter counterterrorism expert welcome back to "viewpoint." >> thanks, good to be here. >> john: happy to have you. one suspect is dead and the other is captured and may be communicating with police. what are the big outstanding questions that still need to be answered at this point. >> the first question you're going to ask are there accomplices
with our government's top national security priority, which is the lawful effective and humane interrogation of this subject for the purposes of gathering intelligence. the boston attacks were clearly inspired by the violent ideology of transnationallist islamist terrorism. so we need to learn everything we can about what foreign terrorists or terrorist groups the suspect and his brother might have associated with, whether they were part of additional plots to attack our nation, and what other relevant information the suspect may possess that could prevent future attacks against the united states or our interests. i think we need to delve further into this whole issue of the education that some people who are motivated by these base ideologies obtain over the internet and the effect that it's having. we should at least know about that. our civilian justice system offers a responsible option for striking this balance with american citizens. it allows the justice department to delay reading a suspect his miranda rights if doing so is in the interest of -- quote -- "public safety.
to contrast that with a well known famous saying among lawyers that hard cases make bad law. in a case like this, with such extraordinary circumstances, around such an aberrant event, the best opportunities to pass meaningful legislation are not in the wake of these sort of crazy one off extraordinary events. what do you make of that? >> well, it is a real conundrum. on the one hand, holmes was right. you don't want extraordinary circumstances to create general law for average circumstances. but in another sense, this was not extraordinary. in fact, we've been living in something of a bubble. the fbi has done actually a fairly amazing job over the last decade of stopping many terrorist acts like when they occurred in other countries and europe and the middle east. and this was one that got through. but there are ways in which you could actually change laws to further enable the fbi. going back to michael isikoff's report. what if members of this mosque in boston had contacted law enforcement authorities under a new program and warned them that this fellow tsarnaev was looking a little errat
, it is against the law to try them in military commissions. >> does the president believe that there is a system in place to adequately target and deal with lone operators, those who may not be tied to some kind of larger extremist organization? >> you have heard the president and many others address the evolving threats that we have as a nation. as we have taken the fight to al qaeda and have met with significant progress in removing from the battlefield senior members of al qaeda central, we have seen other threats develop and emerge. and john brennan, the president, many others, the attorney general have spoken about those threats. i would not in any way characterize the suspects in this investigation in any way with regards to that question because that is something that is being determined by investigators and prosecutors. but there is no question that the threat remains. qaedaains from al central, even though it's been decimated. it remains from affiliates of al qaeda, as we've talked about -- aqap and the like. and it remains within the context of your question, self- radicalized actors,
following the interview. if this were to become law, how department in sure they're adequately screen for national security threats? permit togulations confer with the state department to verify the veracity of an applicant's claim. to what extent do they use the authority? are other barriers that prevent this between the agency's? encies? improved theeatly information available from the get go in terms of what data bases are a check box. that source from the beginning when we collect this. with respect to the state department, we have very could relations with the state area which is the credible fear. >> you will check whether that is an accurate statement. >> yes. we do not take it as being valued. bille concern is that this truncates the process. i would just ask you to look at that. student visao the fraud. this is something i have been interested in since 9/11 when there was a lot of it in the country. schools goingked at back to 2008, most of in 2011. eight of the 14 schools are in my state where there are very suspicious activities going on. have 10,500 schools approved by dhs
donald and seema mody. lingering questions about the boston terror bombing. what law enforcement can do to stop future attacks. former attorney general alberto gonzalez is our next guest up on kudlow. oh, boy. [ groans ] ♪ ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ [ engine revs ] if you've got it, you know how hard it can be to breathe and man, you know how that feels. copd includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. spiriva is a once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that helps open my obstructed airways for a full 24 hours. you know, spiriva helps me breathe easier. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urinating, or an enlarged prostate. these may worsen with spiriva. discuss all medicines you take, even eye drops. stop taking spiriva and seek immediate medical help if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, vision changes or eye pain, or problems passing urine. other side effects include dry mouth and constipation. nothing c
have the right to romaine silent. anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law. this is what is infuriating. he's just beginning to communicate. what information does he have? is there an ongoing threat he knows about? is there foreign connections, foreign links we don't know about? are we going to give him miranda rights at this point in time? go ahead. >> it seems like we've got plenty just on face value to actually prosecute him. we don't really need an admission. but to advise him of his miranda rights, we hear that he was advised today of his miranda rights. how did he respond? did he say he wanted to remain silent or did he waive that and he wants to talk without his attorney present? the interesting part about miranda is once you give somebody miranda they say i want to be silent, you cannot constantly go back to the well and keep asking them do you want to talk now, do you want to talk now? they have to contact you to make it within miranda. outside of miranda you can say, well, off-the-record, outside of your miranda warnings, things that we can't prose
to be watching these guys. maybe we need to change the laws so we can watch them. on the other side lawmakers say this is a free country. you can't just watch somebody because they are strong believers. how deep is the divide? >> we are going to see weeks and months of debate about this. same kind of othing we saw after the failed underwear bombing plot and the times square bombing plot, questions about holding the suspects as enemy combattants. if there is any evidence that the fbi or intelligence services made a mistake expect republicans to seize on that and use it as an opportunity to accuse the president of being too politicly correct in challenging what they think is a war against radical islam. >> i want to bring in a republican from pennsylvania and a member of the homeland security committee. good morning. >> nice to be with you. >> as you go into the briefing what are your concerns and questions in. >> we want to try to know what happened as every other american does with a little more detail. i think you identified the questions that are out there. from the front end, what is it that i
only be tried in federal court. he's never eligible for military commissions. a first year law student could convict this person. what i'm worried about is what does he know about future attacks? he's telling us that his brother was the bad guy, he's sort of just along for the ride. they had no international connections. guess what, he's down-playing his involvement. what i am suggesting is that we use the national security legal system where we can interview him without a lawyer to gather intelligence to prevent a future attack, rather than having to negotiate through his lawyer to get any information. jenna: but, if i could, senator, there seems to be a lot of discrepancy about some of the information come being out about this investigation. >> right. jenna: we've all seen it, you know, played out on the news and otherwise. i would like to drill down a little bit into an even change you just had about the boston terror attacks with the s*epbg o secretary of home land security january elt napolitano. we showed an older brother, this tkhaou owe, that is secretary napolitano. we just sh
to remain silent. in a statement may be used against you in a court of law and have the right not to have your all the words used against you. you may consult with an attorney prior to any questioning and you may have the attorney present during questioning. during the entire proceeding, the only time we actually heard the defendant speak was when the subject came up about an attorney kurt the judge says to you understand i have said everything to you about your right to remain silent and there comes a not. and the defendant says no, the court says let the record reflect that i believe the defendant has said no. once again as you say, the court also answer to the record that he was mentally competent and he also appeared to be listed despite his injuries. >> how much more can they get out of him? how long can they talk to him? is there any legal limit or can this go on? >> it can't go on. normally what happens is the next legal step will be the arraignment. during the arraignment that is when he is formally charged and also remember even though he is looking at the charges of using a weap
? >> represented watertown before the redistricting. i will tell you i was home like everyone else. the law enforcement officials ask everyone to stay indoors. i did because i wanted our law enforcement officials to have the ability to focus their full attention on finding and capturing the people that did this. that is obviously what happened. i hadn't heard a single complaint from anybody in boston about what happened. we were asked to cooperate and we did. we are hearing personal stories from people who were injured or from family and relatives and friends. we have learned a little more about some of the victims who lost their life, how close we all are. it is a closely knit city and it should come as no surprise how many people had some relationship to somebody who got hurt or in some cases killed. >> you directly because you know some of the victims' families. krystle campbell who is one of the victims who died went to high school with your kids she was laid to rest yesterday. you know the family of 8-year-old martin richard. have you been able to get in contact with them? have you bee
, anderson. talking to law enforcement officials this morning, there's two steps. first the question, of course, is, what exactly the suspect is telling law enforcement authorities? the second and related question is, how much of what the suspect is telling law enforcement authorities do they in fact believe, what's verifiable, what they can check out, or what he may be saying because, quite frankly, his brother, the alleged co-conspirator in all of this, is not available because he was killed, you know, on friday. so, there's a lot for the law enforcement officials to do. and we just have to differentiate between what they believe the suspect is telling them and what they believe they can verify and what might be the truth, anderson. >> also lawmakers want to talk to the fbi about their treatment of the older brother, tamerlan tsarnaev, about their interviews with him before he went to russia and any follow-up that they did or did not do, correct? >> yeah. and there's a whole list of questions there, of course, policymakers are asking and we're trying to get to the bottom of what re
's law". the analysis says the obama budget is fair on taxes he raises them on every one. details ahead. a plan to reform the immigration laws with gang of 8 but lamar smith says it is worse than we expected. i'm telling you right now, the girl back at home would absolutely not have taken a zip line in the jung. i'm really gd that girl stayed at home. vo: expedia helps 30 million travelers a month find what they're looking for. one traveler at a time. expedia. find yours. lou: remember when the president promised he would not raise taxes on the middle class? and analysis from the tax policy center finds his budget does that. between 100 and $200,000 per year will pay $150 more in taxes each year some earning less than 100,000 would pay just under $100 and congress is not expected to take up the president's budget anytime soon provide a report finds the internal revenue service over paid billions of dollars in tax credits designed to help low-income families and the ira's overpayments amount between 11.6 billion and 13 point* $6 billion that range is the government's calculation. the bud
procedure when the macials take control. before that, it was local law enforcement and the fbi. so the marshalls will be in charge of him, until he is well enough to leave here. once that happen, he will fly out via helicopter, like whitey bowlser did. they feel like that's the best way to take him to his federal holding cell. how that went down today with the arraignment in his room, the federal magistrate was there, a public defender was there. he mostly answered with nods. obviously, he didn't speak a lot. that could be because there are reports of an injury to his neck. the fbi said neck/head region and to his leg and hand. he in serious conditionful he answered questions by nodding. he did say one word, when they asked him if he could afford a defense team, he said no. that's basic lite only words he really did say. the judge asked if he understood what was happening. his miranda rights were read to him. they decided to read him his miranda rights. those were given to him today as well. the security here is very tight. in fact, what is interesting is, he potentially might get
questions put to you by law enforcement agents or by the assistant u.s. attorney, mr. weinreb. the judge then says i want to make it clear you not prohibited from making statements, but if you do, they can be used against you. you are not required to make a statement at this initial appearance, and any statement you do make may be used against you. finally, if i ask you any questions here in this hearing or at any future hearing which you think might incriminate you you have the right not to answer. do you understand everything i have said about the right to remain silent? the defendant nods affirmatively. the judge says you have the right to have this court assign counsel if you cannot afford counsel or if you cannot obtain counsel. can you obtain a lawyer? the defendant says no. and this is the first time we know that he can speak, because he does speak. he says just that one word. and apparently he says it with difficulty, because the judge responds by saying, let the record reflect that i believe the defendant has said no. i have provisionally appointed the federal defender to repres
away what he say. i talked to one law enforcement official that has a little built of concern. and the concern is this, that we are finding more and more about his older brother, who obviously went overseas. there's questions about how he trained and he was somebody who was a manipulative personality. withwe are learning how he tookr of his wife, and by some reports pushed her very strongly to convert etch obviously is somebody, as we are hearing reports about his nature you are, was someone who was somewhat aggressive. the worry about a couple law enforcement folks i have spoken to is the younger brother may not have as much information as the older brother would have had. that's something they will learn as we go forward. but now that he's been mirandized, that changes everything as. we. >> adam, thank you. after the fire fight and after running over his brother, he took off. a homeowner sent swarms of police race to go a backyard and suddenly bomber 2, dzhokhar tsarnaev, was surrounded. listen to the dramatic reports leading to his capture. >> a report from watertown of 67
or not he's able to understand what we would say in the law what's going on, whether he can speak or not. being in fair condition in the kinds of details you've heard about what's gone on in the initial hearings with law enforcement, with magistrate, does it seem as though he's moving in a direct of being able to assist in his own defense? >> yeah, you know, look, when we talk about speech, and this is putting on a medical legal hat, chris, speech is a general term in the medical sense, meaning that it refers obviously to the spoken word. but also the written word, even gestures, even being able to respond to questions, yes or no. but it also refers to the ability to process and understand any kind of speech. so, it appears that he's able to do both, you know. he's able to understand from, again, i'm hearing the same things that you are, but also able to execute some sort of communication as well. and you know, we heard some of the things that he was able to convey yesterday. so what we want, you know, from a medical standpoint, know that someone's who's hearing, yb understanding and exe
as an enemy combatant. we will prosecute this terrorist under u.s. law. united states citizens cannot be tried in military commissions. this is absolutely the right way to go and the appropriate way to go. and when it comes to united states citizens, it is against the law to try them in military commissions. >> and it matters that the white house is treating the idea of holding an american citizen outside of the american legal system as what it is, which is crazy and unacceptable. and it matters that appears to be where americans stand on the issue too. when asked just last week in the midst of the aftermath of the boston bombing, with the images and videos of the horror there, the top of everyone's mind, which worries you more, the government will not go far enough to investigate terrorism because of concerns about constitutional rights, or that it will go too far in compromising constitutional rights in order to investigate terrorism. more people answered they are more worried about the government going too far. today is the first day of a big, important test for us as a country. a test of w
on boston bombing coming up this hour. when we return we're going to get into the law of this case. dzhokhar tsarnaev was formally charged today. he'll be prosecuted through the criminal justice system despite republicans who say he should be treated as an enemy combatant. >>> later, the russian connection. we have new details about the older brother, tamerlan, and his six-month trip overseas to russia, that area, as he became increasingly more devout in his religion and radicalism. >>> here in washington, the marathon bombings have already started to change the debate on things like -- you knew this was coming -- immigration. >>> finally, life started to return to normal this weekend in boston. i was up there as the slow healing begins. this is "hardball." as we say up there, "hardball." the place for politics. >>> he will not be treated as an enemy combatant. we will prosecute this terrorist through our civilian system of justice. >> welcome back to "hardball." that was of course, white house spokesman jay carney short by before 1:00 p.m. today making clear the boston suspect will not be t
a few officials, one with law enforcement, couple with intelligence, and what we do know is that, of course, this is good news, right? they actually thwarted this plot. we know that it targeted a train route between the united states and canada. one law enforcement official pointed me towards a line that runs between new york city and toronto. it runs actually from buffalo, new york. i'm told that the plan was to detonate explosives in canada. and derail -- and derail the train. and my law enforcement source said there had been some reports that they wanted to wage a spectacular attack, blow up a bridge. he said no. he said what they were doing was to target the train on the tressels, and actually what they wanted to do was derail the train and cause maximum injury to the people on it. >> so two quick follow-ups with you, gloria. first, whether we look at u.s. response here of what happened in boston, canada, an example of it working well, right? coordinated investigation, caught the plot early, and they have been watching it for over a year, haddize izeyes on the si, right? >>
flags but i don't think would require calling law enforcement. >> he made two protests on two different incidents. he branded people non-believer. clearly he was getting quite intense about his religion. >> yeah, i think that's where a qualified scholar or leader would need to step in and talk to him and see what his mindset was and from there, make a call on kind of what direction he was taking his religion. >> what has been the reaction in the mosques, both yours and the one of course that tamerlan tsarnaev attended? >> with regards to what? >> well, to what's happened. >> our reaction to what? >> your reaction, your discovery that somebody attending one of the mosques has been the perpetrator of this appalling bombing. >> i think first and foremost as bostonians, our hearts and prayers are with the community. then there's a sense of anger and frustration that someone who would frequent one of our faith institutions would carry out such acts, so people seem to be very angry and upset with what he's done. >> is there any new system that you can put in place to raise more warning flags
clear that there's any law that would allow him to be tried as an enemy combatant. this is a procedure we know works. people get tried in criminal courts every day. the combatant laws we don't know that one can be successfully conducted. that's lost in a mar ras in guantanamo bay. this case will take a long time, be expensive and complicated but he's going to trial and there's going to be a verdict. we know that. >> jeff, thank you very much. fran, julia, as well. appreciate it. follow me on twitte twitter @andersoncooper. what do you think? should he be charged in a criminal court opposed to an enemy combatant? >>> and we will dig in to the case. the older suspect spent last year in parts of dagestan and chechnya. and the older suspect's widow. what we know about her and their relationship and more importantly what the fbi wants to know from her tonight. >>> later, my interview was remarkable woman. i hope you stick around for this. she a dance instructor whose body was broken. she had to have part of her leg amputated below the knee but her spirit is certainly not broken. >> i woke u
will prosecute this terrorist through our civil system of justice. underu.s. law, the united states citizens can not be tried rather in military commissions. martha: but house armed services commission buck mckeown argues that the white house should reconsider. he says, quote, it seems premature to declare that we will not treat tsarnaev as an enemy combatant since we don't know about his affiliations. clearly american citizens must be tried to civilian court, but the same citizen viciously attacked his countrymen, should be exploited for his intelligence value before any trial begins. that will be a debate that rages on for some time on this issue. we'll talk more later in the show with former new york city mayor rudy giuliani. bill: looking forward to that coming up here. meanwhile the feds want to talk to the widow of the suspect, tamerlan. she is mother of 3-year-old daughter between the two. the her lawyer said talks are underway with the feds how to proceed with that. he revealed on the last day tamerlan was home when his wife left for work. martha: well the officers who capturedded dzhokh
in statements from some of the lawen -- lawen lawen -- law enforcement investigation agency. we will see if he was already mirandized or going to, but my thought is they are proceeding to the public safety exception. >> he could get the death penalty underfed rail law. >> but not in the state of massachusetts. they do not have the death penalty. the federal charges will trump and precede any of the state prosecution. those are what he is looking at. as an alternative life without the possibility of parole. even if he proceeded byway of the jury trial they could have that option in the penalty phase. my thoughts are he will through his representation work out a plea agreement and if the feds go for it, he will get life without possibility and go to florence, colorado to the supermax. >> what did you make of this announcement? from the white house podium, i would have pushed those questions to the fbi and the department of justice, but they decided to do it from the white house. >> i think the white house is there trying to figure out themselves how they handle this. they clearly -- look, let's
our civilian system of justice under u.s. law the united states citizens cannot be tried in military commissions the. >> bill: well some constitutional experts dispute mr. cancery's statement if you partner up with a foreign terrorist organization you become part of that. it's about interrogation not about trial "wall street journal" has by far the most section tonight left one bomber dead, one police officer dead and other bomber gravely wounded. joining us from boston brian bender "boston globe" reporter and craner. let's pick it up ms. cram kramer with the two suspects in cambridge around 10:00 p.m. thursday night. take it from there. >> yes. that's when the chaos essentially began. what happened was they come upon officer sean collier, for reasons we do not understand yet and may never understand they open fire on him. the word that has been used for that was an assassination by police. police have called it an assassination. from there, they move to hijack a vehicle from a man who was driving a mercedes bins. they take the vehicle and drive it into water town. they release the m
dzhokhar, aka, human garbage, will not be tried as an enemy combatant in response to enemy law i can makers to call it information gathering purposes. he is carney jie. he will not be treated as an enemy combatant. we will treat it through our system of justice. united states citizens cannot be tried in military commissions. >> can i see the mike tobin thing again? never mind. a leading republican senator says there is a legal option to declare dzhokhar, aka, [bleep] face an enemy combatant. >> under the law of war there is no right to legal council when you are being questioned for national security purposes. i hope the obama administration will allow us that option that exists in our law. they have a very bad track record here. >> cane see mike tobin again? >> 10 seconds later the second explosion goes off according to the fbi at the location where he dropped his -- please don't do that, where he dropped his knapsack. shepherd? >> the only bright spot in this whole thing. ambassador, is it a mistake not to label him a combatant? can we still an interrogate him? >> there is a choice that h
with law enforcement sources is entertaining the idea that he may have been framed because he did write extensively on the internet about his conspiracy theories and signed off many of his misses i'm kevin curtis and i approve this message. that is language that is very similar to that contained in the letters that were sent to the president, senator or robert wicker and as well a local judge in tupelo, mississippi, it was written i'm k.c. and i aprof this message i believes his brother was framed. the fbi acted too quickly in this case. this happened right after the boston bombings, they were under a lot of pressure to come up with a suspect. he says they simply came up with the wrong one. bret? >> bret: okay, john. much more on this with the panel. a strange story. we will hear from paul kevin curtis. a hazardous materials team is investigating another possible tainted letter this time a military facility. senator harry reid said it is joint base anna cost i can't bowling. the two suspects in what canadian officials say was a plot to derail a passenger plane in court today. neither en
will prosecute this terrorist through our civil system of justice. under u.s. law united states citizens cannot be tried in military commissions. and since 9/11 we have used the federal court system to convict and incarcerate hundreds of terrorists. >> stephanie: yeah, bill clinton was doing a pretty good job of that until george bush came in -- >> he mucked it up. >> you are welcome america. got rid of that surplus. >> stephanie: i was reading the parade magazine piece, on the libary. >> stephanie: yeah, i have a libary, and he hopes he will be remembered as an honest guy. [ buzzer ] >> stephanie: kind of the guy that lied us into iraq, but okay. an honest guy? that's the first thing he threw out there. i said this yesterday, he can't be charged -- lindsay, lindsay, talking to you. well-known southern bell he is an american citizen, you can't. >> and peter king is trying to move the goal post by saying the brought the battlefield to america. no, he's an american citizen -- >> he doesn't have an american name, because then -- because he talks weird with a weird accen
penalty, is that what you're saying? >> reporter: sure. because then he's got cooperating with law enforcement, but he's also lost his leverage by saying this. it is in his interest to be able to tell them something. >> you think a lawyer, michael, would have told him to hold out until he got a deal? >> reporter: absolutely. absolutely. the one thing a lawyer is going to try to do at this point is to save his life. the one way to do that is show cooperation by pointing the finger at somebody else or helping them find somebody else. look, i don't take these statements at face value, just, you know, just to be clear. you know, he could well be protecting somebody. clearly there were others who they were talking to. it's hard to imagine the two of them just simply became radicalized by themselves without any encouragement from anybody else. >> that surprises me, too. >> reporter: seems there was an accomplice in the plot. and also, we have the statements from the uncle who says there was somebody who radicalized the older brother. >> so let me thank you very much. >> reporter: that's
was plotting. [siren] >> the reports of involvement by her husband and brother-in-law came as an absolute shock to them all. >> and they tell us she is cooperating with the feds. now the man who says the accused bomber's car jacked him talks about his dramatic escape. plus, why it could soon cost you more to shop online. >> this is simply about leveling the playing field. >> but it is anything but fair. >> the new plan for an internet sales tax. and a little boy in the jaws of an 8-foot alligator. >> trying to bite my arm off. >> hitting him in the head really wasn't doing anything. it was like hitting a bring wall. >> tonight, his father reveals the trick that saved his son's life. my mom and dated having the nightmares. i'm sleeping good. >> you will meet him. but first from fox this tuesday night. american investigators traveled to russia today to question the parents of the accused boston marathon bombers. that's what an official at the u.s. embassy is telling the associated press. the official says the russian government is cooperating with the fbi and helped arrange this interview. of cou
combatant. >> we will prosecute this suspect under u.s. law. united states citizens cannot be tried in military commissions. >> reporter: it's a move at least one senator is asking is the administration to reconsider. >> we know that these two individuals embrace radical islamic thought, that there is ample evidence this was an attack inspired by radical ideology. they were not trying to rob a bank in boston. >> reporter: and we're now getting a look at the transcript from today's bedside hearing for dzhokhar tsarnaev, who is still unable to speak because of the gunshot wound to his throat. the judge said, i will ask whether or not the patient is alert. you can rouse him. at that point, the doctor asks, how are you feeling? it shows the defendant was able to nod affirmatively. live in the newsroom, eric rasmussen, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> senator dianne feinstein says she wants answers about the older of the two brothers. reports say the fbi earlier interviewed 26-year-old tamerlan tsarnaev based on a tip by the russian government and that tamerlan made a trip to russia last year. >
was last monday and made it virtually a known just a week later. the entirety of the law enforcement that worked this case should be commended for their efforts. >> reporter: court documents contain new details about thursday night's car jacking. the fbi says surveillance pictures show dzhokhar and tamerlan tsarnaev at a gas station in cambridge where they drove with the owner of the suv they carjacked. one of them, investigators say, began the carjacking by pointing a gun at the driver and saying, "did you hear about the boston explosion? i did that." the carjacker showed the driver he had bullets in the gun and said, i'm serious. at the scene of the shootout in watertown where tamerlan tsarnaev was killed other explosives were also found. in an interview for "dateline nbc," the boston police commissioner said that's one reason he thinks the brothers planned other attacks. >> we had to step over unexploded devices they threw at the officers. i can only understand from that that they had other targets. they were going other places. >> reporter: both charges today carry the death pena
, and made it virtually unknown just a week later. and the entirety of the law enforcement that worked this case should be commended for their efforts. >> reporter: court documents also contain new details about thursday night's carjacking. the fbi says surveillance pictures show dzhokhar and tamerlan tsarnaev at a gas station in cambridge where they drove with the owner of the suv they carjacked. one of them, investigators say, began the carjacking by pointing a gun at the driver and saying, "did you hear about the boston explosion? i did that." the carjacker showed the driver that he had bullets in his gun according to the fbi and said, "i'm serious." at the scene of the shootout in watertown where tamerlan tsarnaev was killed, other explosive devices were also found. in an interview for "dateline" nbc, the boston police commissioner says that's one reason he thinks the brothers planned other attacks. >> we had to step over some unexploded devices that they threw at the officers. and i can only understand from that that they had other targets. they were going other places. >> that wa
's older brother, tamerlan who was killed friday morning was a lawful permanent resident, one of the two told a carjacking victim thursday night they were the boston marathon bombers, a search of dzhokhar's umass dartmouth dorm room turned up a hat and jacket corne jack y suspect number 2. tsarnaev remains hospitalized at beth israel hospital with gunshot wounds to his head, neck, legs and hands, authorities believe one was sev-inflicted in -- self-inflectioned in a botched suicide attempt. >> canadian authorities announcing in connection with fbi they have broken up a terrorist plot to blow up a passenger train and bridge somewhere between toronto and u.s. border. a ballot they believe had ties to al qaeda overseas. >> the individuals were receiving support from al qaeda elements located in iran, i can tell you, this there is no information to indate that these attacks were state sponsored. lou: the royal mounted canadian police stressing at no point during the invest visio investie public in danger. lou: we bin with the investigation of boston marathon bombing now focused on the tsarna
of the law enforcement should be combhited to their efforts. >> court documents contain new details about thursday night's carjacking. the fbi show tamerlan and dzhokhar tsarnaev in cambridge at a gas station where they drove with the owner of the suv they carjacked. one began the carjacking by pointing a gun at the driver and saying, "did you hear about the boston explosion? i did get" the carjacker showed the driver he had bullets in his gun according to fbi and said, "i'm serious." at the shooting in watertown where tamerlan was killed, other explosives were found. a boston police commissioner says that's one reason he thinks the brothers planned other attacks. >> we got to step over some unexploded devices that they threw at the officers and i can only understand from that that they had other targets. they were going other places. >> that's nbc news' pete williams reporting. >>> well, today members of the house will get a top secret briefing on the boston bombings. meanwhile, the head of the senate intelligence committee is demanding the fbi explain why more wasn't done to investigate
that we all have given through congress. i don't know what the law is spent we will make a request on that and appreciate your follow up on it. we go now to karen bass of california. >> thank you, mr. chair. i want to congratulate secretary kerry on your appointment, and also join my colleagues in expressing my condolences. >> thank you. >> i look forward to working with you, and especially working with the committed men and women at the state department. i have to tell you that i've really enjoyed working directly with the state department and i'm honored to have an excellent pearson fell in my office who i am looking forward to continuing to work with me. as the ranking member of the african subcommittee all wanted to share with you several priority issues i hope you will consider. first of all come u.s.-africa trade relations. number two, the importance of development assistance programs, including global hiv/aids funding through pepfar. number three, support for peacekeeping operations. as you know the u.n. is considering establishing a peacekeeping force and mali and there's a
the process is under way. >> juliette, from a law enforcement standpoint, do you think it was the right decision to try him in civilian court? >> absolutely. like what jeff said, there is just really no debate about this. it's more of a political debate. for one, the law doesn't even cover him because he's a u.s. citizen. but from a law enforcement national security perspective, what better way to minimize the impact of terrorists than to treat them like criminals. that's what they are. if you make them into sort of a bigger deal than he is or anyone is, it sort of gives them a relevance we actually don't want to. so a lot of people in national security and counterterrorism love this idea. not only because of the legal underpinnings behind it but also because it sort of says to anyone who would harm us, you're just a criminal. >> there has also been a lot of successful prosecutions of terrorist suspects in criminal court. >> you can learn a lot of evidence from this. when i first got into this field it was right after the africa bombings, african embassy bombings in '98, and some of the
law. >>> san francisco's police chief, make a better celebration on market streets. >> the unsolved killing of a whole foods, new p making the arrest. >> i will have what you can expect tomorrow on the temperatures coming up. look at them kids. [ sigh ] they have no idea what it was like before u-verse high speed internet. yeah, you couldn't just stream movies to a device like that. one time, i had to wait half a day to watch a movie. you watched movies?! i was lucky if i could watch a show. show?! man, i was happy to see a sneezing panda clip! trevor, have you eaten today? you sound a little grumpy. [ laughter ] [ male announcer ] connect all your wi-fi-enabled devices with u-verse high speed internet. rethink possible. >>> the camp has made the -- workers in protected suits and masks filled bags with belonging left behind. the same area was cleaned back up in october but the homeless came back. they're convinced of the 30 estimated 200 people lived there were able to enter a program for permanent housing. >>> the site is still in the work to be named sf72. it's name for the 72 hou
was shocked by her husband and brother-in-law's actions. >>> in dagestan, the boys' mother, still in denial. >> i am mother. i have -- you know, i know my kids. i know my kids. i really my kids would never get involved into anything like that. >> in the boston area, local police are now taking a closer look into a possible link between older brother, tamerlan tsarnaev, and a 2011 unsolved triple homicide. >>> and local police are also taking a look at what links there may have been. in canada, two men charged with plotting to blow up a passenger train between toronto and new york make their first appearances in court while on capitol hill senator charles grassley keeps raising the boston plot as he opposes the timetable for immigration reform. >> the tragic events that occurred in boston and the potential terrorist attacks of the u.s. canadian railroad are reminders that our immigration system is directly related to our sovereignty and national security matters. >>> and guess who is coming to dinner? the president hosts the women of the senate, senator kirsten gillenbrand is here to preview
significantly more complex. american law enforcement officials currently track terror networks by tapping into chatter, monitoring videos and reports of field agents, but even if the fbi is tipped off to potential american terrorists, there's are limits to what can be done. "the new york times" reports that after the tib questioned tamerlan tsarnaev in 2011, officials had quote no authority to watch him because they found no terrorism activity at the time. this scenario that an american could and would do this while flying under the radar raises serious questions regarding national security. the "washington post" writes the boston attacks might serve as a new model for terrorism in the 21st century. seeing how two kids with backpack bombs seem to have succeeded in putting a major u.s. city on lockdown, it may now dawn on al qaeda leaders that a series of small-scale attacks like this conversation the same impact as one spectacular mass casualty attack. through a combination of skill and luck, we've done well at preventing the next 9/11. preventing the next boston massacre might not be as
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